Twist And Shout Hydrangeas

Filed Under: Biennial Plants · Keywords: Twist and Shout Hydrangeas · 1700 Views
We love our twist and shout hydrangeas, had them for a couple of years now and in the Spring they look great but as the Summer goes on they start to develop these dark spots on the leaves and the blooms hardly develop at all. Have them planted East side of home so they do get afternoon shade, tried to attach a picture, let me know your thoughts. We live in the St. Louis, Missouri area...

Thanks, Al
amanbirk1@gmail.com

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Answer #4 · Maple Tree's Answer · AL-Both organic or inorganic fertilizers are fine to use on your hydrangeas. Organic fertilizers are nice as they feed the soil, keeping it rich with nutrients, which in turn once broken down continually feeds the plants. I have a fairly rich soil so I like using a slow release well ballanced fertilizer formulated for shrubs and trees. There are many good slow release fertilizers available at your local quality nurseries or garden centers. I normally use Osmocote as its nutrients are already in a usable state for the plants to take up and only has to be used once in the spring as it released nutrients slowly for approximately 6 months. When using Osmocote make sure it is worked a little into the soil as it needs to be covered in order to stay moist and release the nutrients. It may take a little while but feeling the soil at times will allow you to know when the top few inches of soil becomes dry and time to water again. Some like to use a moisture meter which is available at most nurseries. The meters probes will test the soil to a depth of approx. 8 inches of so. This will give you an idea as to how often the plants needs watering to stay moist but not wet or dry. The plant as you mentioned is also a great indicator as to when they need watering. I actually watch the hydrangeas I have in pots to know when they are thirsty. After some time now watching how long it takes for them to slightly wilt has given me a good idea as to how many times a week they need watering. I noted a link below to an article on how to fertilize and water your hydrangea you may like to read. There are several other articles you can find in Gardenality on hydrangeas that can be of help also. Just click on the link to go directly to the article.

http://www.gardenality.com/Articles/1103/How-To-Info/Fertilizing/How-To-Fertilize-And-Water-Hydrangeas/default.html

Please don't hesitate to ask any other questions you may have. Let me know how your hydrangea is coming along.

John)


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Al Birkenmeier

Al Birkenmeier · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
very much appreciate your advice. I will implement and keep you posted on progress...
Take care,
Al

6 years ago ·
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Answer #3 · Maple Tree's Answer · Al-Both the systemic products you mention will help to prevent and control this black spot disease. Normally I think of using a systemic fungicide as a post infection treatment to guard against the fungal diseases as it is taken up by the plant and moved throughout. Once the disease has infected my plants I have always used a contact fungicide with much success. I have always used products containing Neem Oil as it is natural fungicide, pesticide, and a miticide. It not only controls Black Spot disease but will kill harmful insects also without harming our beneficial insects. When spraying with neem oil be sure to wet both the upper and lower surfaces of all the foliage. Treatment every 7 to 10 days usually controls this disease after 2 or 3 applications. Besides treating with a fungicide be sure to remove and or pick up and destroy the infected leaves so the disease does not spread. In the early spring if your plant is very dense you can thin out the plant by removing some of the older largest stems from throughout the plant. This thinning out of hydrangeas if need be helps to provide better air circulation throughout the plants helping leaves to dry more quickly during rainy or humid conditions. Try also to water you hydrangea from below keeping leaves as dry as possible. At this time I would most likely treat with a spray such as the neem oil and possibly use a systemic fungicide in the spring to help with infections next year. I noticed some of the leaves on your hydrangea have been eaten by insects. It looks as though it may be Japanese beetles or other insects. The neem oil will help kill these insects along with controlling the Black spot disease. The picture you uploaded does indicate Black spot fungal disease. I also uploaded a picture of a hydrangea with black spot disease.

Please ask if you have any other questions.

John)


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Picture about Twist And Shout Hydrangeas

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Al Birkenmeier

Al Birkenmeier · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
John, thanks again for your help and advice. I will implement you suggestions and for the record I do not water hydrangeas from above and always water at the ground level. Can you give any advice on nutrition for the hydrangeas that will help with health and blooms for the future... I may have over watered throughout the summer as I was told that hydrangeas need a lot of water, Can you recommend a barometer for how much to water. Some plants I notice when they get dry the leaves start to sag, would that be a good thing to look for to prevent over watering? Thanks again, Al

6 years ago ·
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Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Al-I wasn't able to pull up a picture from the link you provided. Above this and to the right of your name below your question you will see where you can upload any picture you have saved on your computer. Just click on the 'Upload a Picture' in blue text.
Black or dark spots on hydrangea leaves is normally an indication of a fungal disease. Usually this is not harmful if treated but it can make the leaves look really lousy. Fungal disease can develop from too much water and or humid conditions. Overhead watering can cause fungal diseases to develop especially if the leaves do not dry quickly. It is best to always water your hydrangeas at the soil and not wet the leaves with a sprinkler or hose. Rains during the summer along with high humidity can also bring on these fungal diseases. Check the soil by digging down 6 to 8 inches in spots around the shrub. The soil should feel cool and moist but never wet or too dry. Sometimes it is easy to over water when the plants are located on the east side of the home as the soil may not dry out as quickly with afternoon shade. I believe your location has had some rain and high humidity during October which may have helped to cause this condition or leaf spotting. Remove any heavily infected leaves as the fungal spores can spread to other parts of the plant by wind or splashing water from sprinklers or rain. If spotting continues a copper based fungicide or neem oil can be used to help control the fungal disease. Let me know what you find when checking the soil for too much moisture. I will be notified immediately when any picture is uploaded or you reply and will get back to you as soon as possible. A close up of the leaf spotting should indicate the problem.

John)


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Al Birkenmeier

Al Birkenmeier · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
John, thanks for the quick reply. I wanted to try again to upload a picture for your review, however I noticed since the weather has cooled some and I slacked off of watering because of that the new growth is looking much better. Had a friend recommend a couple of products, Bonide Rose Rx Systemic Drench or Fertil-lome 2-N-1 Systemic, wonder what you thought about that and if I should treat anymore this year or wait to next Spring Summer... finally got picture uploaded...

6 years ago ·
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Answer #2 · Al Birkenmeier's Answer · John,)


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