Cherry Laurel With Yellow Leaves After Transplanting And Moving

Filed Under: Shrubs, Planting, Watering, Techniques & Methods · Keywords: Cherry Laurel, Yellow, Leaves, Dropping, After, Digging, Transplanting, Moving, Relocated · 3922 Views
I have some Cherry Laurel's that I just transplanted the other week. I think they are 5 years old. Since planting them, they have developed some yellow leaves and they are dropping leaves. The plant looks pretty healthy otherwise as far as I can tell. I watered them a couple times relatively heavily last week because it was pretty hot. Is this normal? Am i over watering? I have pictures too but I can't see how to post them. Thanks so much!


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Ryan Suzuki

Ryan Suzuki · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
So I think it was underwatered due to me not doing the watering slow enough. I put a slow drip on it and they all bounced back and look a lot more vibrant. Thanks all for the help!

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
You're very welcome. That would definitely be an indication of the wilting of the leaves. Glad they have perked up. Let me know how they are looking into the summer months.

5 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Glad to hear they're doing well.

5 years ago ·
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2 Answers

Answer #2 · Gardenality.com's Answer · Hi Ryan - John gave some excellent advice. The yellowing and dropping leaves are most likely from transplant shock. Any time I transplant an older shrub I always prune the plant back some. How far to prune depends on the type of plant. For cherry laurel, I'd suggest maybe a light pruning. With a picture we could probably give more details as to how much to prune. Root Stimulator is a good idea as well.

Brent)



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Answer #1 · Maple Tree's Answer · Hi Ryan-If these Laurels have done well in the ground for 5 years and now many of their leaves are yellowing and dropping it is most likely due to some transplant shock. If there is no apparent spotting or damage to the leaves we can most likely rule out insect damage causing the yellowing. Laurels like many shrubs don't like being moved and the larger they are the slower they may recover from transplant shock. It is likely that some of the roots may have been cut or damaged. When this happens many plants will put their energy into developing new roots to support the shrub again at the expense of new foliage. Leaves not supported well will yellow then drop. At this time of year it is also normal for many evergreen shrubs to shed some of their older leaves which will turn yellow and drop. Your yellowing leaves may be happening because of these two reasons. This type of transplant shock is not abnormal and once the plants start to re-establish new roots and become acclimated to their new location the dropped leaves will be replaced by new leaf budding. If the shrubs are quite large it would help to prune them down somewhat giving the plants less foliage to support at this time. Yellowing leaves can also be an indication or too little or too much water. Cherry laurels do not like to be kept too wet. Over watering can saturate the soil suffocating the plant, not allowing the roots to get enough oxigen and other nutrients. Of course not enough water or drought conditions can harm a newly planted laurel. Keep the soil moist but never too wet or dry. A slow deep watering once or twice a week during the first summer making sure the entire root ball is moistened should be enough. Short daily waterings is usually not enough to soak the entire root ball. One the plants are established again in their new location these plants a quite drought resistant. Besides keeping the soil moist but not wet you want to make sure the shrubs were planted at the same depth or level with the sourrounding soil as before. Transplanting the root balls below grade can also suffocate the roots depriving them of oxygen. Planting too deep can also cause rotting of the roots in time. As you said the plants were transplanted just a few weeks ago and since then the yellowing leaves have appeared. Because of this I'm assuming some transplant shock and or possibly too much water may be the cause of the yellowing and dropping of leaves. If you hadn't done so when transplanting your shrubs you can water with a mix of water and root stimulators. Root stimulators contain nutients that will help to develop new root growth. Root stimulators can be purchase at most nurseries and garden centers.

If you would like to upload a picture of the Laurels and an upclose picture of the yellowing leaves it may help. Above this answer and to the right of your name below your question you will see where you can upload any pictures you have saved on your computer. If you upload a picture I will be notified and will get back to you.

You can leave any comments regarding this answer by using the comments box below this answer. Please ask if you have any other questions.

John)


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Ryan Suzuki

Ryan Suzuki · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Oops I just saw what you said about the comment box. I'm new so thank you for telling me how it works. I posted the pictures above.

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
Ryan-Hey, no problem. Its takes time to know how to use the programs. The plant does look like it is going through some transplant shock. The overall wilting of the leaves would be a good indication of this with some loss of roots when digging it up. Of course this wilting can also be caused by too little water or too much. You have been watering them so too little shouldn't be the problem unless the soil is not being moistened to the depth of the root ball. Some of the leaves I see that have yellowed look as though they are some of the older leaves that will drop at this time of year naturally. The others that are yellowing I think may be doing so with the plant staying too wet. A few leaves I see yellowing with browning of the margins in spots looks to be an indication of too wet a soil. Too little water I believe would show up in more browning of the tips and margins of the leaves. As Brent mentioned it would help to prune the shrub somewhat to releave some of its stress trying to support the canopy it had prior to losing some of the root system. From the looks of its size I wouln't do any heavy pruning. I would probably cut off about 8 inches of the plants height. It looks as though the plant will survive. Just keep the soil moist but not wet and of course not too dry. If digging down around the plant at times the soil should feel cool and moist but never too wet. Let us know how the plant is doing down the road.

5 years ago ·
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Ryan Suzuki

Ryan Suzuki · Gardenality Seed · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Thank you so much. I bought some root stimulator. One other related question, when I transplanted them, I was told by a landscaper to just cut the top of the burlap sack that the root ball was in and leave the rest. Was that a fine idea or should i do my best to remove more of it? thanks!

5 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Looks like a little transplant shock to me as well. As John said, some light pruning would probably help...and monitor watering making sure not to overwater. Just keep the soil damp to somewhat moist but not constantly soggy.

5 years ago ·
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Maple Tree

Maple Tree · Gardenality Genius · Zone 10A · 30° to 35° F
I normally will remove as much of the burlap as possible if it can be done without damaging or moving roots too much. Leaving the burlap is fine as it will deteriorate and roots will grow through it. Try and pull out as much as the twine that ties the burlap together as possible. Sometimes a plastic or wire tie or rope is used and this will not deteriorate in the soil. The one thing to look for is that the plant was not planted too deep. Many times when trees and shrubs are dug up and wraped additional soil is packed up against the trunks before wraping with the burlap. This is to give some extra support between the plant and root ball. Make sure any additional soil that may have been added above the top of the root ball is removed. If there was soil added and the shrub was planted level with the top of this additional soil the shrub will be planted to low. Let us know how the plant is doing.

5 years ago ·
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Gardenality.com

Gardenality.com · Gardenality Genius · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
I've planted thousands of B&B laurels over the years and always have left the burlap on, only cutting the string around the base of the trunk and trimming away the exposed burlap after having planted the shrub. When the burlap is removed you risk letting some soil fall away from around the roots, exposing them to air. When the roots of this plant are exposed to air it can cause problems.

5 years ago ·
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