How To Reposition Or Protect Young Tree Trunks That Are Crossing Or Rubbing Against Each Other?

Filed Under: Tools and Equipment, Trees, Techniques & Methods · Keywords: How To, Protect, Reposition, Young, Tree, Trunks, Rubbing, Crossing, Each Other · 1735 Views
I planted some clump quaking aspen trees and one of them the stalks are trying to cross eachother. I asked someone at my nursery about it and he mentioned a prodcut that is soft foam that you can wedge between the stalks that won't damage them. He said it helps to encourage them to grow apart. I've looked everywhere and can't find such a product. Does anyone know where I would be able to find this? Thank you!


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Answer #1 · Gardenality.com's Answer · Hi Mary - I haven't seen any product on the market made of foam for use to keep tree trunks separated. I'd be afraid to place any type of material to close to the trunk as it might trap moisture that could cause the bark of the tree to start rotting. That being said, a piece of styrofoam or water resistant foam might work. But eventually, if the trunks weren't repositioned so that they weren't crossing each other, they would grow together.

If a young, flexible tree trunk is crossing another trunk, sometimes I'll try to re-position the trunk and then use a tree stake and wire or nylon cord to hold it the way I want it to grow. Drive the stake at an angle in the ground a couple feet or so away from the tree so that it's facing away from the tree. then tie a nylon cord around the stake and around the tree trunk. Use a piece of rubber garden hose to run the wire or string through when tying it around the trunk. This ensures the string won't rub and damage the bark. After a year or so the trunk should be trained to grow in the direction you positioned it to grow.

Hope this info was helpful. Let us know if you need more details or have any other questions.

Brent)


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Mary Dawson

Mary Dawson · Gardenality Sprout · Zone 8A · 10° to 15° F
Thanks Brent! I really appreciate you taking the time to post this answer for me.

9 years ago ·
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